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5 Ways to Save for Summer in 5 Weeks

5 Ways to Save for Summer in 5 Weeks

Summer vacation. During your elementary, middle, and high school years, those two magical words meant three months of freedom! No school, no waking up early, no early bedtimes. It was your annual reward for grinding through the previous nine months of academic pursuits. Yet somehow, summer always managed to fly by faster than it was supposed to! Now that you’re an adult, your summertime respite has probably shortened considerably. Instead of three months, you might get a week away—maybe two, if you’re lucky. But just like when you were young, you always wish your time away could last just a little bit longer. It seems like no matter how old you get, summer vacation still holds a special kind of magic. There’s still time to save for summer vacation! But even with all the sun-kissed nostalgia that makes summer vacation a lifelong treat, there’s one thing that can ruin the fun faster than a thunderstorm at the swimming pool: vacation-related debt. Summertime memories are fun to recall, but it’s not nearly as fun to receive monthly reminders that you’re still paying the price for that fun—plus interest. If you’re like most people, summer usually sneaks up on you. You start the year with good intentions, but somewhere along the way you forget to set aside money to cover your vacation plans. With summer only a few weeks away, you might be wondering whether it’s possible to save enough money to cover this year’s vacation. We’re happy to report that it’s absolutely possible! It will take some discipline, but you can do it. Here are five tips to help you...

Fraudulent Email Notification

Fictitious email messages, allegedly initiated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) regarding funds purportedly under the control of the OCC, have been sent to some credit union members. Any communication claiming that the OCC is involved in holding any funds for the benefit of any individual or entity is fraudulent. The OCC does not participate in the transfer of funds for, or on behalf of, individuals, business enterprises, or governmental entities. If you have received an email from the following email address, do not respond – it is fraudulent: office2comptroller90@gmail.com deadhead@kfedisbroke.com name@officeocc.com The perpetrators may request, among other data, bank account information, including bank statements, with the purported purpose of making a large dollar deposit into your account. Do not respond in any manner to any proposal supposedly issued by the OCC that requests personal account information, or that requires the payment of any fee in connection with the...
Make Spring Cleaning Pay Off This Year!

Make Spring Cleaning Pay Off This Year!

People sure do like their stuff. Whether it’s the latest tech gadgets or knick-knacks that have been passed down through generations, the things we own hold a special place in our hearts and homes. So, when our possessions pile up, as is their tendency, what’s the logical thing to do? That’s right—rent a self-storage unit. What? That’s not the answer you were expecting? According to a report by Sparefoot, one out of every 11 Americans pays for storage space to keep their overflowing belongings. That’s right, not only are people finding additional ways to store their things, they’re paying good money to do it—$38 billion a year, to be exact. Spending money to stow away various items you don’t need and will probably never use—seems silly doesn’t it? We agree. In fact, we think springtime is the perfect season to do the exact opposite. Clean house. Cash in. Over the past few years, de-cluttering has seen a spike in popularity, thanks in large part to proponents like Joshua Becker and Marie Kondo. While experts like Kondo preach the soul-cleansing benefits of getting rid of anything that doesn’t “spark joy,” we recommend doing it for an entirely different reason. Cash. Cold, hard cash. Don’t get us wrong, we big fan of the physical and emotional perks that come from cleaning house, but we also believe that making a little extra money would make you feel pretty good too. If you’re inspired but unsure where to start, we’ve compiled a helpful list of everyday items that carry solid resale value and the best ways to sell them. Electronics Maybe you just...
Let the Taxpayer Beware: Learn to Spot Six Common Tax Scams

Let the Taxpayer Beware: Learn to Spot Six Common Tax Scams

Now that your W2s and miscellaneous tax documents have arrived, tax season is officially in full swing. While it’s easy to get lost in optimistic daydreams about your tax refund and all you’re planning to do with it, it’s important to remember that scam artists are probably dreaming about what they could do with your refund as well. After reaching an all-time high of more than 700,000 cases in 2015, tax refund fraud has been declining thanks to significant enforcement efforts by federal, state, and private agencies. While these statistics are encouraging, they also highlight the ongoing need for caution and vigilance. So, before you file your 2018 taxes or pay someone to file for you, we want to remind you about six of the most common tax-related scams happening today. Phishing Emails This one is relatively easy to spot. Why’s that, you ask? Because the IRS doesn’t initiate communication with taxpayers via email. So, if you see an email from the IRS pop up in your inbox—even one that looks remarkably official, don’t bother opening it. For good measure, go ahead and mark it as spam before deleting it. Emails of this type have only one goal: to trick you into clicking a fraudulent hyperlink or responding with sensitive personal information. Phishing 2.0 In 2018, the IRS reported a new twist on traditional phishing scams. In the new approach, fraudsters hacked the systems of legitimate tax professionals, stole tax returns containing personal details, and then deposited funds directly into taxpayer bank accounts. After those deposits hit the bank, the criminals posed as the IRS or collection agencies and...